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Instagram Public Photos with #givingbirthinamerica

Good morning mamas! got family in colorado ? this deal is for you ! #givingbirthinamerica #givingbirthinamerica #modatravels #modabirthservices #nohiddenfees

comment 2 star 17 2 hours ago

This morning as @nygovcuomo signs an executive order to protect women’s reproductive rights in the state of new york. “this is the time to fight back. this is the time to resist. this is the time to make your voice heard. this is the time where every new yorker has to say, you’re not taking women’s right to reproductive rights away. we’re going to protect ourselves because this is the state that has always stood up for what’s right.” #givingbirthinamerica

comment 26 star 843 2 days ago

Alexis, alexandria va (2/3)
"after my talk with the anesthesiologist, it was the first time i allowed myself to break down. i cried and i flipped out… but i was thankful for his honesty. although they had told me i would be put under, they decided that morning that i would go through the surgery with only a spinal tap – so awake the entire time. it was a last-minute decision, but i was able to hear my son being born. then they whisked him away and i had to wait for everything else to be over. he was delivered at 1:15 and i was in the or until about 5 o’clock, staring at the light. the staff put music on – adele – and now every time i hear that d**n album, it brings me back to that or. i remember everything: their call to the blood bank, which was freaky, and being freezing cold and shaking. luckily, they kept checking on me, making sure i was okay. and i was. when i got to the recovery room, i was incredibly bloated. my legs were twice their normal size. i have one selfie of that moment, and my face is just horrible; i was blown up like a balloon. but i regret not having more photos, now. that’s the way it is. my son was fine. totally fine. i saw him four hours later, and we recovered together for the next two or three days, in the hospital. when i hear all the stories of the other women around me today, i feel… i feel like i did pretty well. i got lucky."

comment 1 star 18 2 days ago

Alexis is the next survivor educating the world about placenta accreta and the near-miss experience. she is also the founder of @heroesformoms and kindly allowed me to join forces and start the heroes for moms- new jersey branch. ❤️
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#repost @facesofpostpartum
alexis, alexandria va (1/3) "i had placenta accreta with my first viable pregnancy. before that, i had two losses and went through a total of four surgeries – two d&c for the miscarriages and two hysteroscopies to remove a uterine septum. the latter condition was likely the cause of the miscarriage, and i’m quite sure that those four surgeries are what caused my accreta in my third pregnancy. i had been put on bedrest at about twenty-seven weeks because my c****x had shortened too much and they didn’t want me to go into labor. so i worked from home for two months. then, during a routine ultrasound, they told me something was wrong with my placenta and asked me to do an mri to ‘make sure it wasn’t accreta.’ they tried to explain what it was as well as they could, but of course i went home and googled it, and you find out how crazy and scary it is. doing an mri pregnant is also very stressful and obviously not normal, neither for you or for the medical staff. i spent three days home worrying about the results as they didn’t call me the day after the mri, like they were supposed to. but when they did, they simply asked me to go to another hospital than the one i was supposed to deliver to, which was a big red flag for me. they didn’t tell me anything. just, ‘go!’ when i got there, i was admitted right away and was told that not only i had accreta, but that i had to deliver my baby right now. i was thirty-six weeks pregnant and three days. luckily, i was able to wait it out until that friday, which led us to the thirty-seven-week marks. all i remember from the day my child was born is that when they were prepping for the surgery, the anesthesiologist came in and gave me a reality talk. it was the first time somebody had taken the time to look at me in the eyes and explain to me that i could die. he sat down and just said, ‘i want you to know that we will do the best we can to make sure you don’t.”

comment 1 star 24 3 days ago

Alexis, alexandria va (1/3) "i had placenta accreta with my first viable pregnancy. before that, i had two losses and went through a total of four surgeries – two d&c for the miscarriages and two hysteroscopies to remove a uterine septum. the latter condition was likely the cause of the miscarriage, and i’m quite sure that those four surgeries are what caused my accreta in my third pregnancy. i had been put on bedrest at about twenty-seven weeks because my c****x had shortened too much and they didn’t want me to go into labor. so i worked from home for two months. then, during a routine ultrasound, they told me something was wrong with my placenta and asked me to do an mri to ‘make sure it wasn’t accreta.’ they tried to explain what it was as well as they could, but of course i went home and googled it, and you find out how crazy and scary it is. doing an mri pregnant is also very stressful and obviously not normal, neither for you or for the medical staff. i spent three days home worrying about the results as they didn’t call me the day after the mri, like they were supposed to. but when they did, they simply asked me to go to another hospital than the one i was supposed to deliver to, which was a big red flag for me. they didn’t tell me anything. just, ‘go!’ when i got there, i was admitted right away and was told that not only i had accreta, but that i had to deliver my baby right now. i was thirty-six weeks pregnant and three days. luckily, i was able to wait it out until that friday, which led us to the thirty-seven-week marks. all i remember from the day my child was born is that when they were prepping for the surgery, the anesthesiologist came in and gave me a reality talk. it was the first time somebody had taken the time to look at me in the eyes and explain to me that i could die. he sat down and just said, ‘i want you to know that we will do the best we can to make sure you don’t.’"

comment 7 star 32 3 days ago

Never you over look any opportunity. @modabirthservices (@get_repost )
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just take the right steps .. it’s really as simple as abc. contact @modabirthservices #modababy #givingbirthinamerica #modababies #modabirthservices #modatravels

comment 1 star 12 4 days ago

Just take the right steps .. it’s really as simple as abc. contact @modabirthservices #modababy #givingbirthinamerica #modababies #modabirthservices #modatravels

comment 8 star 117 4 days ago

Alisha, danville ca (3/3)
"we didn’t have any family nearby, so they had to fly or drive in to take shifts to care of my firstborn. it was such a tough time. i never imagined that i would be spending four weeks postpartum in the hospital. and what they don’t tell you is that once you’re past that time, it’s not like if you go home and all of a sudden, you feel great. you have long-term morbidity issues. for example, i’ll always have chest pain, lots of follow-ups, bladder issues and all these things we don’t talk about because we’re not supposed to. what you’re supposed to do is to be happy that you and your child survived. it’s obvious that i’m grateful, but it doesn’t mean it’s not extremely hard. i felt really angry that nobody had talked to me about accreta before. not that it would have made an enormous difference in my situation, but i would have liked to be armed with information. i was shocked that not even my doctors wanted to talk to me about it, but i realized that some didn't even know about the condition! so afterward, i decided that i would advocate as much as i could for accreta patients, and for the maternal mortality movement. i met other women, like kristen, with whom i founded the national accreta foundation. that’s been a wonderful place to channel all of this and try to find a place where i can heal and help as much as i can. so, here i am…"

comment 2 star 29 4 days ago

Alisha, danville ca (2/3)
"i often describe her birth as the furthest thing from natural labor you can get. i was put under for the entire time, and when i woke up, six hours later, i was in the icu, and i was intubated with a breathing tube. i didn’t know what was going on. i had aspirated during surgery and had a lot of complication from that. my daughter was fine. she was born three and a half pounds. she was a fighter, and they put her in the nicu to get lung care. next thing i learned was that they had to perform a hysterectomy: my uterus, my fallopian tube, and a portion of my bladder were gone. i called it the ‘organ fire sale!’ they just took them all out. i had a lot of other complications postpartum and stayed in the hospital for a total of four weeks. when i was released, we transferred my daughter to another nicu, closer to home. we visited her the next day after i left the hospital, but i started to not feel well and went to the nearest er. it turns out i had 3000 cc of fluid sitting underneath my lungs from aspirating during the surgery. i had infections, and i still had a catheter that i had to carry around because my bladder wasn’t healed. i stayed in their icu for a week, but they couldn’t get a handle on it, despite all the procedures and chest tubes and draining of all sort, so they transferred me back to my original hospital, under my surgeon’s care. that’s when things started to turn around, and i began to feel a little bit better. but again, all this time i was away from my newborn, who was in another hospital, and from my two-year-old who was home and whom i hadn’t seen in weeks. i was hooked up to so many things, and quite frankly, i didn’t want to see her because every time we talked, it was heart-wrenching."

comment 2 star 24 5 days ago

Alisha, danville ca (1/3)
"i had my first child via c-section because she was breech. for my second, i was already prepared to try a vbac, but unfortunately, when i went in for my anatomy scan, things weren’t right. there was a lot of talk in the room and whispering behind windows. they told me i had a condition called placenta accreta. that was the first time i’d heard that word, and while my doctor was doing the scan, he didn’t describe what it was to me. he only said that there was a possibility he’d have to remove my u****s at childbirth. that’s all. so, i went home, and i did what you’re not supposed to do: i googled ‘accreta.’ big mistake, because this condition is quite dangerous. basically, the placenta attaches too deeply into the uterine wall. it can go through the u****s and start to attack other organs, cause internal bleeding or maternal death. no one had ever mentioned to me that placenta accreta is also a risk factor after you’ve had a c-section. i had to wait until the third trimester for my doctors to confirm that i had, in fact, this condition. the wait was very scary, but i found a support group, which was great, and tried my best to talk to different doctors to understand a bit more about the condition. they all seemed hesitant to talk to me about it until they knew for sure. unfortunately, we found out that not only did i have accreta, but i had it in its rarest form, called percreta, where the placenta had attached to my bladder. i ended up delivering early, at under thirty-two weeks, because i started having contractions. i had an emergency surgery and it was fairly traumatic: there were about twenty doctors and nurses in the room, and we had to wait forty minutes because there wasn’t enough of my blood type, which is kind of daunting because you are, essentially, preparing yourself to bleed out during labor."

comment 1 star 23 6 days ago

Secure your child's future as much as you can.
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for more details,
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comment 2 star 20 4 days ago

Good morning, we have yet another deal. not interested in cooking ? slide into dm for more #modababies #modabirthservices #modatravels #givingbirthinamerica

comment 20 star 199 5 days ago

This is one of my survivor sisters. she was so brave to be the first to share her story that day and she shared it so eloquently. we love you, alisha! 🧡
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#repost @facesofpostpartum
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alisha, danville ca (1/3)
"i had my first child via c-section because she was breech. for my second, i was already prepared to try a vbac, but unfortunately, when i went in for my anatomy scan, things weren’t right. there was a lot of talk in the room and whispering behind windows. they told me i had a condition called placenta accreta. that was the first time i’d heard that word, and while my doctor was doing the scan, he didn’t describe what it was to me. he only said that there was a possibility he’d have to remove my u****s at childbirth. that’s all. so, i went home, and i did what you’re not supposed to do: i googled ‘accreta.’ big mistake, because this condition is quite dangerous. basically, the placenta attaches too deeply into the uterine wall. it can go through the u****s and start to attack other organs, cause internal bleeding or maternal death. no one had ever mentioned to me that placenta accreta is also a risk factor after you’ve had a c-section. i had to wait until the third trimester for my doctors to confirm that i had, in fact, this condition. the wait was very scary, but i found a support group, which was great, and tried my best to talk to different doctors to understand a bit more about the condition. they all seemed hesitant to talk to me about it until they knew for sure. unfortunately, we found out that not only did i have accreta, but i had it in its rarest form, called percreta, where the placenta had attached to my bladder. i ended up delivering early, at under thirty-two weeks, because i started having contractions. i had an emergency surgery and it was fairly traumatic: there were about twenty doctors and nurses in the room, and we had to wait forty minutes because there wasn’t enough of my blood type, which is kind of daunting because you are, essentially, preparing yourself to bleed out during labor."

comment 2 star 23 6 days ago

It took 127 units of blood to help keep the nine of us alive. one hundred twenty seven.
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over the next few weeks, @facesofpostpartum will be featuring our harrowing ordeals. there were a lot of tears the day we shared with each other and no doubt it will bring much of our experiences to the forefront again as we see each of these posts this month. my hope and prayer is that our openness helps women out there know that they aren’t alone- that there are a lot of us- and that there is hope even in those dark trenches after a near death experience. if you are a survivor or know of one who needs the support of others, come find us! (link in profile)
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#repost @facesofpostpartum
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on the eve of the march for moms in washington dc this past may, i had the honor to sit down with nine women who are part of an online community for maternal near-miss survivors – women who nearly died as a result of childbirth – to talk about their experience. for almost four hours, they told raw, courageous, and honest stories about their births and postpartum periods. one after the other, they shared the reality of what it means to ‘survive’ childbirth and its aftermath: the psychological, emotional and physical tolls of having given life, and yet, almost lost yours. the publication of these interviews will take a different format than usual: some will be long and be told over the course of multiple days, others will be short and unfold all at once. at the end of the month of july, the complete stories will be available on the facesofpostpartum[.com] page, for you to (re)read. i hope you are as enlightened and moved by their testimonies as i was ❤️. and if you are a survivor or know one who needs the support of others, you can find them here:
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http://www.facebook.com/groups/maternalnearmiss
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#facesofpostpartum #mnmsurvivors #maternalhealth #heroesformoms #heroesformomsnj #preventaccreta #stoptheclot #ppcm #maternalmorbidity #pphproject #marchformoms #safemotherhood #everymothercounts #maternalhealthawareness #givingbirthinamerica #moms #motherhood #pregnancy #pregnancycomplications #maternalhealthmatters #maternalmortality #itstillhappenshere #survivor #survivorstrong

comment 3 star 37 6 days ago

Afternoon people ! philly bound ? deal alert #modababy #modababies #modabirthservices #givingbirthinamerica

comment 2 star 53 6 days ago
comment 4 star 248 1 weeks ago

#repost @everymomcounts with @get_repost
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our #givingbirthinamerica film series highlights some of the challenges and solutions to providing safe, respectful and equitable maternity care in the united states. learn more about its part in the national movement to turn the tide on the us maternal health crisis at blog.everymothercounts.org.

comment 1 star 18 2 weeks ago

Facts time!!!!!!! lagos state, nigeria economy

how much do you know or love about lagos?

tag a friend who loves lagos!

follow us @liberthomes for more facts
amazing facts you never knew about lagos state √ lagos has a population estimated at 21 million in 2016 √ the 5th largest economy in africa. √ the major tourist destination √ lagos is a major financial centre in africa and the highest in gdp

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comment 0 star 10 2 weeks ago
comment 4 star 77 2 weeks ago